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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
to have a really sound science before you make those difficult decisions. you know, i am a scientist. i have been taking care patients for 30 years. and i know that you don't change an operation that you do because some people have said that this new operation is a lot better. all right. you need to have years of unbiased will result before you make a critical decision that affect people's lives. frankly, i have not been convinced us what the real facts are. and i certainly don't know that we should be spending trillions of dollars over science that is argued about. because i have been through this before. i have seen people tout the medical theory, saying how great it was and see people act on that end the disastrous results. and i don't want to do that in the field of global warming. >> moderator: thank you. mr. mcdowell, you have one minute. mcdowell: i just look at the scientific issues. this should be an issue based solely on the science of the issue. right now, our legs have dropped about 20 inches in the last 10 years. i looked across the bigger and it really frightens me. i don'
place in the name of science. before the long ascrention and specially designed capsule, his body had been fitted with a multitude of sensors to record his heart rate, blood pressure and other vital life signs to monitor how the human body copes with sustained free fall and acceleration and deceleration. >> keep your head down. >> to stop his blood boiling, his lungs exploding and his body disinterest at the grating he washese a pressurized suit and the whole thing is funded by a soft drink manufacturer. >> start the cameras. and i've got an angel to take care of you. >> felix baumgartner, why did you want to do this? >> well, you know, i have been -- i always have been a very competitive person, since i was 16 years old i started skydiving and i always wanted to push the limits. that's the reason why i was working on this so hard. >> but it's not like competing at tennis or at pool or a running race. to put yourself on the edge of space miles and miles up, i mean, that's completely different. >> it is, but that's what makes it so unique and challenging, because if you look at my back
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> our fourth story, a super storm headed for the northeast. hurricane sandy has lost some strength, but forecasters warn that it is extremely powerful. it's left more than 20 dead across the caribbean. now, states florida to massachusetts are bracing for wind sh rain and widespread power outages. chad myers is tracking sandy. this weather system is massive. tell us how big it is, how wide the impact could be. >> it will be all way from maine to north carolina. every state in that area will get some type of damage. the storm now just leaving the bahamas and it will be making its way up to the northeast. we don't know where it's going to go yet. the the models are from rhode island to about washington, d.c., but i will guarantee you this, every place in this circle will have some type of damage. whether it's wind, trees knocked down, powerlines knocked down coastal erosion or flooding. one of our vendors, wtt, said this may be in some spots, a 1,000 year flood. kind of lik
powerful. just two weeks ago, the proceedings of the national academy of sciences published a major study on the connection between warmer sea surface temperatures and increase in stronger atlantic hurricanes. but the report said -- we begin today's show with two guests. it with me in oregon we're joined by greg jones, a climate scientist and professor of informal studies at southern oregon university in ashland. and joining us by videostream is bill mckibben, co-founder and director of 350.org. he is author of numerous books including, "eaarth: making a life on a tough new planet." on november 7, 350.org is launching a 20-city nationwide tour called "to the map" to connect the dots between extreme weather, climate change, and the fossil fuel industry. we welcome you both to "democracy now!" let's start with bill mckibben. you just made it back to your home in vermont. can you talk about the significance of what the east coast is facing right now. >> i think the first thing is this is a storm of really historic proportion. it is like something we have not seen before. it is half the size
by the audience, of faculty members, and political science department, as well as the byu law school. some questions were edited for clarity. mr. hall will have the first question of the debate. for subsequent questions, we will alternates. each candidate will have a minute to as a question and both will have an additional 30 seconds for a bottle. if i determine that a follow-up question is aboard -- is appropriate, each will have a follow-up question. the first is from joseph, a student at purdum non-. -- at byu. >> what responsibilities are the state and local government and what responsibilities, if any, are the federal government? >> i served on the board of directors for sutter health care, so the largest not-for- profit health-careization in california we have known for a long time that we've had to have affordable quality health care. it is all our responsibility. under the affordable care act, we are first beginning to do what we need to do to reform health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i would like to put my children back on to health care until they're 26. i al
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. vsp members can save on all authentic transitions lenses, including our new transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. >>> obama's ohio fire wall. cnn is out with a new poll in the state tonight with the the president leading mitt romney 50-46 and that's unchange frd the last cnn poll in ohio taken just avenue the first debate. john king has been looking at the latest numbers. what else does it tell you? >> it's important to look at this poll. thest a small lead. that's yet another poll the president's kept that narrow lead in ohio. you mentioned the horse race. here's one of the biggest factors. in a battleground state like this, the president's getting the democrats, romney's getting a republic
systems to integrate social media and data visualization tools with social science, analysis. his writing has appeared in the asian "wall street journal," foreign policy, he's been interviewed by major news organizations around our world. it's my pleasure to welcome to the stage here in gaston hall, dr. kim. [applause] >> thank you for your kind introduction, president john degoiia. the korea economic institute is very honored to be a cosponsor of the distinguished panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian and pacific affairs. i can think of no better partners than the edmonds school of foreign services and president john degoiia and georgetown university to share this unique platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i really do think that the 21st century will be seen as an asia-pacific century, much of the economic dynamism and growth will emerge from this region. and, of course, many of the toughest global challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and, of co
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
science guy. i have to tell you, michael bloomberg is an opportunist. you violated the new york city charter by running for a third term as mayor. we are in a very dire state here and i wish republicans run the country would offer us new york republicans help and an opportunity to really balance out the political system here. host: thank you for the call this morning. if a time for a few more calls. all weekend long we will be featuring the history and literary life of vermont capital city with a population of just about 8000 people. the smallest united states state capitol. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the smallest state capital and america. in terms of vermont, we have the largest historic district in the state. it is a very historic community, founded in 1791. it is run to about 20,000 during the day. largely because of the jobs that are here, the center of commerce and the area. we are fortunate here that we are somewhat insulated from a lot of the trends that occurred nationally. our economy is pretty stable because we rely on the state as a pr
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
, favors republicans. this is not rocket science. to the extent that voting in florida is a debacle, it's one made by design. the ballot in florida is ten pages long. and with fewer days to vote, you get really long lines. but that's the way it goes in florida now. leading up to the election, florida republicans cut the time for early voting in half. so now floridians stand in long lines. they pass new restriction on registering voters so thousands fewer new voters signed up. and the governor has tried to purge the voter rolls. in south florida and palm beach county, 30,000 ballots were printed wrong. clerks have been copying what the voters marked on to new ballots that can fit into the tabula tabulating machines. dozens asked for absentee ball the lots and still haven't gotten them because they screwed up the ballots. the situation is worse in broward county where people have waited for weeks for absentee ballots. you can say that florida's election is another debacle in the making were it not already a debacle right now. and it is. joining us is joy reid. she's an msnbc contributor w
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. nyqui tylenol: me, too. and cougnasal congestion.ers? nyquil:what? tissue box (whispering): he said nasal congestion... nyquil: i heard him. anncr vo: tylenol cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion... nyquil cold & flu doesn't. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a butto
to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amount of your time, effort and largesse to the cause. you wouldn't be here otherwise. so, let's talk a little bit or think a little bit if i can motivate you to do that about this business of our government and our military capabilities and what they can do. as i mentioned, you saw a little tiny blip in the video. i still believe that the biggest thing and the most powerful thing and fastest thing the military can bring to the table is disaster response. we have the capability to move quickly and to do things to make a difference. however, there are lots of other things we can do and facilitate, and that is o
they are to vote. high turnout favors democrats. low turnout favors republicans. this is not rocket science. to the extent that voting in florida this year is a debacle, it is a man-made debacle. it is a debacle by design. in some towns the ballot this year in florida is ten pages long. and filling it out takes longer, and with fewer days to vote, well, yeah, magic, you get really long lines. but that's the way it goes in florida now. leading up to the election, florida republicans cut the time for early voting in half. so now floridians stand in long lines. they pass new restriction on registering voters so thousands fewer new voters signed up. and governor scott has continued trying to purge the voter rolls in florida, challenging voter registrations in to the final weeks before the vote. in south florida and palm beach county 30,000 absentee ballots were printed wrong. clerks have been copying what the voters marked on to new ballots that can fit into the tabulating machines. dozens more voters asked for absentee ballots and still haven't gotten them, days much about the election. becaus
and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. tohange comes when we live up america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our atmosphere, that will make us less dependent on foreign oil. that is
discussion than science to talk about climate change. we don't know what a correct temperature is. but i do believe that there is a valid role for the federal government in protecting unownable resources. so i do peeve that there is a very -- believe that there is a very strong role that is not being played out at all right now. crony capitalism has made it awfully difficult for people to actually seek some kind of compensation for when a company builds, you know, a plant right next to your farm and starts belching smoke into it. we should have more recourse than we do in courts of law. unfortunately, the taxation regulation that these guys have been giving us for the last hundred years have made it difficult to hold large corporations accountable because they are, of course, the biggest campaign contributors. we should be following the money on this and not thinking it's inconsequential if you have millions and now billions and trillions of dollars going into campaigns. do we think that that does not come without strings? and when it comes to environment, that's serious. >> moderator: than
are making a big effort to apply science to this redeployment. um, when will you have completed the agreements with the stans, the central asian republics? >> there are some treaty sensitivities there, clearly, but i am confident that by the end of this year or early next year that will be delivered. >> right. um, and do you think norton will be able to cope with the withdrawal? >> yes, i do. there's work going on in prize norton, but it's also about ports of entry as well as airports of entry. so this is a national effort in terms of the site of this. what i do is make sure that the redeployment of equipment will not in any way hinder the military operation that equipment is supposed to support. so there's an equilibrium here about supporting transition right through to 2013 and the end which you've heard us describe and how much equipment we can take out. and that's a fine balance which we address and scrutinize on a regular basis. >> so if norton is not itself going to be i pose one would call it -- i suppose one would call it a pinch point or something, are there any other b
don't know whether that's because of how computer science is conducted in universities or, you know, i'm not with larry summers. i think it's also showed and not physical. but on the other financial literacy, we didn't address that here because were only looking at earnings and not as income from financial assets. we purposely made that decision to focus on earnings. as it is, that's an issue for the top 20% of the country. 93% of the value of all financial assets and that includes pensions and retirement accounts and savings accounts in stocks and bonds, all financial assets, which is to say every asset in the economy except homes, art and gold or whatever are held by the top 20% of the country. the bottom 80% control 70% of the value of all financial assets. so, that financial literacy in the top 20% and probably does have an effect on income
even the after with political reform. that our science the other element elements in national community they are getting weary of this conflict. the turks i think are a little weary right now. there've been some comments even from the obama administration, shifting from the manichaean view towards assad. so all of these scenarios don't present too much of a pretty picture, and, obviously, lead to more death and destruction in the near term but, unfortunately, there are no easy answers to this. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. we have two respondents. we have paul sullivan, professor of economics, national defense university as was agenda professor in the security studies program at georgetown university. will ask and become first and then lastly we'll have ambassador take the tooth, president and ceo of america-mideast education and training. spent i have not been more torn of the situation were longtime that the situation in syria. this is a serious business. now, when people mentioned soft power, i think there may be some of get the impression that this is having peace on
is there for a specific reason and not in manchester, 20 miles to the north. there is a lot of science to this. there is a lot of polling that goes into it. it is very strategic. we have had a lot of candidates here for the primary. we have had a lot of exposure to them. certainly, voters here are knowledgeable about who these people are after going through the primary. the different debates that go on. host: neil levesque, executive director of the new hampshire institute for politics, thank you. there are four electoral votes at stake in new hampshire, and it is considered a tight race. it's history of being a swing state continues as it is on our list. our conversation continues about the battle states, the battleground state of new hampshire with -- our competition continues about the battleground states of new hampshire. kathy sullivan is the chairwoman of the democratic party. she tried to us from manchester this morning. if i could begin with the "washington post" piece. republicans say that romney's team is far ahead of what senator john mccain had in place for years ago. but the exten
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)